History Live! Events

The partners of Southwest Colorado Humanities Roundtable have created a dynamic and entertaining series of events for the 2022 Calendar year. Check out these event descriptions and participate in this year’s History Live! programming.

The Evolution of the Guitar

Saturday, September 3, 2:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Presented by The Powerhouse
Location: The Powerhouse, 1333 Camino Del Rio
Contact: Charlotte Ford, 970.259.9234

Join HP Newquist, Director of the National Guitar Museum, to explore the 4,000-year history of the guitar and its evolution as our culture’s most iconic musical instrument. This presentation will be the closing celebration of The Powerhouse’s summer-long visiting exhibition, Medieval to Metal: The Art and Evolution of the Guitar, featuring 40 historically and artistically significant instruments.

Examining a Challenging Past:
The KKK in 1920’s Bayfield

Wednesday, September 7, 6:00 – 7:30 p.m.

Presented by Pine River Library and the Center of Southwest Studies
Location: Pine River Library
Contact: Darcy Poletti, darcy@prlibrary.org, 970.884.2222 ext. 522

In 1920s Bayfield, Pine River Klan No. 69 of the Ku Klux Klan numbered more than 100 members. A century later, the community will gather to examine this chapter of the town’s past. Why should we care? What can we learn from hateful history and how can it help us move forward? A panel discussion will feature experts from Bayfield’s history museum, Fort Lewis College, and the Center of Southwest Studies at Fort Lewis College, which has housed a collection of KKK records and artifacts from Bayfield discovered above an old commercial garage and donated nearly 40 years ago.

 

Gala Community Picnic at The Old Fort

Thursday, September 8, 3:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Presented by the Fort Lewis College Life-Long Learning

Contact: Gary Rottman at gsorcer@hotmail.com.

PROOF OF VACCINATION REQUIRED

The Old Fort Lewis was originally established as an Army Post in 1880. In 1891 the Fort was decommissioned and converted to a federal, off-reservation Indian boarding school. Later in 1911 an agricultural and mechanic arts high school was established there under the jurisdiction of the Colorado A&M (present CSU), eventually becoming a full four-year college. In 1956 the college moved to its present location atop Reservoir Hill overlooking Durango.

This free Program includes a tour of the facilities at 3:00, and lectures at 4:00 by Beth LaShell, Director of the Old Fort, on its history and at 6:00 by Majel Boxer, Associate Professor at FLC, on the Indian School at the Old Fort. Between presentation from 5:00 to 6:00 attendees are invited to enjoy their B.Y.O. picnic on the grounds.

 

The Evolution of the Guitar

Saturday, September 3, 2:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Presented by The Powerhouse
Location: The Powerhouse, 1333 Camino Del Rio
Contact: Charlotte Ford, 970.259.9234

Join HP Newquist, Director of the National Guitar Museum, to explore the 4,000-year history of the guitar and its evolution as our culture’s most iconic musical instrument. This presentation will be the closing celebration of The Powerhouse’s summer-long visiting exhibition, Medieval to Metal: The Art and Evolution of the Guitar, featuring 40 historically and artistically significant instruments.

Examining a Challenging Past:
The KKK in 1920’s Bayfield

Wednesday, September 7, 6:00 – 7:30 p.m.

Presented by Pine River Library and the Center of Southwest Studies
Location: Pine River Library
Contact: Darcy Poletti, darcy@prlibrary.org, 970.884.2222 ext. 522

In 1920s Bayfield, Pine River Klan No. 69 of the Ku Klux Klan numbered more than 100 members. A century later, the community will gather to examine this chapter of the town’s past. Why should we care? What can we learn from hateful history and how can it help us move forward? A panel discussion will feature experts from Bayfield’s history museum, Fort Lewis College, and the Center of Southwest Studies at Fort Lewis College, which has housed a collection of KKK records and artifacts from Bayfield discovered above an old commercial garage and donated nearly 40 years ago.

 

Gala Community Picnic at The Old Fort

Thursday, September 8, 3:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Presented by the Fort Lewis College Life-Long Learning

Contact: Gary Rottman at gsorcer@hotmail.com.

PROOF OF VACCINATION REQUIRED

The Old Fort Lewis was originally established as an Army Post in 1880. In 1891 the Fort was decommissioned and converted to a federal, off-reservation Indian boarding school. Later in 1911 an agricultural and mechanic arts high school was established there under the jurisdiction of the Colorado A&M (present CSU), eventually becoming a full four-year college. In 1956 the college moved to its present location atop Reservoir Hill overlooking Durango.

This free Program includes a tour of the facilities at 3:00, and lectures at 4:00 by Beth LaShell, Director of the Old Fort, on its history and at 6:00 by Majel Boxer, Associate Professor at FLC, on the Indian School at the Old Fort. Between presentation from 5:00 to 6:00 attendees are invited to enjoy their B.Y.O. picnic on the grounds.

 

The History of Hula with Ka Pa Hula I Na Mauna

Friday, September 9, 4:00 – 5:00 p.m.

Presented by the Durango Public Library
Location: Durango Public Library
Contact: Daisy Grice, daisy.grice@durangogov.org, 970.375.3387

Hula: a means of perpetuating and preserving the culture of the Hawaiian people throughout history.  The local group, Ka Pa Hula I Na Mauna, will provide a demonstration of this unique form of storytelling through song and dance and discuss the history and cultural significance of hula.

 

Coal – The Other Black Gold

Saturday, September 10,  1:00 – 2:00 p.m.

Presented online by the Animas Museum
Location: online, register at animasmuseum.org/events.html
Contact: Animas Museum, info@animasmuseum.org, 970.259.2402

Local historian Charles DiFerdinando will explore the history of coal and its importance to the development of Durango and La Plata County.  This webinar is part of the La Plata County Historical Society’s Second Saturday Seminar Series celebrating the Society’s 50th anniversary.  There is no charge for the webinar, which will be recorded, but registration is required.

As Seeds, We Grow:
Student Reflections on Resilience Curator’s Tour

Tuesday, September 13, 5:30 – 7:00 p.m.

Presented by the Center of Southwest Studies
Location: The Center for Southwest Studies, Fort Lewis College
Contact: Elizabeth Quinn MacMillan, 970.247.7333, museum@fortlewis.edu

Elise Boulanger, Curatorial Fellow, will lead a guided tour of her exhibition As Seeds, We Grow: Student Reflections on Resilience which celebrates Indigenous identity and resilience with consideration to Fort Lewis College’s history as a federal Indian boarding school.

The History of Hula with Ka Pa Hula I Na Mauna

Friday, September 9, 4:00 – 5:00 p.m.

Presented by the Durango Public Library
Location: Durango Public Library
Contact: Daisy Grice, daisy.grice@durangogov.org, 970.375.3387

Hula: a means of perpetuating and preserving the culture of the Hawaiian people throughout history.  The local group, Ka Pa Hula I Na Mauna, will provide a demonstration of this unique form of storytelling through song and dance and discuss the history and cultural significance of hula.

 

Coal – The Other Black Gold

Saturday, September 10,  1:00 – 2:00 p.m.

Presented online by the Animas Museum
Location: online, register at animasmuseum.org/events.html
Contact: Animas Museum, info@animasmuseum.org, 970.259.2402

Local historian Charles DiFerdinando will explore the history of coal and its importance to the development of Durango and La Plata County.  This webinar is part of the La Plata County Historical Society’s Second Saturday Seminar Series celebrating the Society’s 50th anniversary.  There is no charge for the webinar, which will be recorded, but registration is required.

As Seeds, We Grow:
Student Reflections on Resilience Curator’s Tour

Tuesday, September 13, 5:30 – 7:00 p.m.

Presented by the Center of Southwest Studies
Location: The Center for Southwest Studies, Fort Lewis College
Contact: Elizabeth Quinn MacMillan, 970.247.7333, museum@fortlewis.edu

Elise Boulanger, Curatorial Fellow, will lead a guided tour of her exhibition As Seeds, We Grow: Student Reflections on Resilience which celebrates Indigenous identity and resilience with consideration to Fort Lewis College’s history as a federal Indian boarding school.

The Chaco Solstice Project: An Update

Wednesday, September 14, 7:00 – 9:00 p.m.

Presented by the San Juan Basin Archeological Society (SJBAS) and the Department of Anthropology, Fort Lewis College (FLC)
Location: The Ballroom at Fort Lewis College
Contact: Janice Sheftel, Janicesheftel@gmail.com or check SJBAS.org

The Solstice Project is an interdisciplinary team of archeologists, archaeoastronomers, geodesists, and remote sensing experts that studies the heritage of the Chaco culture. Founded in 1978, following the rediscovery of the Sun Dagger site on Fajada Butte in Chaco Canyon, the Project researches the achievements of the Chaco people: how they envisioned a cosmology through monumental buildings, non-utilitarian roads, and rigorous geometries in a vast desert landscape. The Project has undertaken new, groundbreaking research that shows the immense region of the Chaco world, using aerial imagery, precise surveying techniques, and LIDAR.  Insights come from Project Puebloan advisers, combined with new understandings of Mesoamerican parallels for cardinal directions, the interplay of vertical and horizontal axes, ritual roads, cacao, shells, spirals, and the sun and the moon.

Sunsets, Suburbs, or The Sublime: Which West is Yours?

Thursday, September 15,  7:00 – 8:30 p.m.

Presented by Fort Lewis College Lifelong Learning
Location: 130 Noble Hall, Fort Lewis College
Contact: Gary Rottman, gsorcer@hotmail.com
PROOF OF VACCINATION REQUIRED
Explore visions of the American West with journalist and art historian Judith Reynolds as she examines the romantic idealism of Ansel Adams, the documentary eye of W. H. Jackson, the bleak realism of Richard Misrach, the fantastic imagery of Jerry Uelsmann, and the plainspoken record of Durango’s own Frank Gonner. The goal is to examine ways-of-seeing, encourage new understandings, and possibly shift personal preferences.

Ancient Life Ways Technology Workshop: Yucca Cordage Manufacturing with Mary Weahkee

Saturday, September 17, 10:00 a.m. – noon

Presented by the Southern Ute Cultural Center and Museum
Location: Southern Ute Cultural Center and Museum
Contact: Raelynn Torres, ratorres@southernute-nsn.gov, 970.563.2998

Join us for this workshop led by Mary Weahkee, Assistant Archaeologist at the New Mexico Office of Archaeological Studies. Ms. Weahkee, a member of both Santa Clara Pueblo and the Comanche Nation, is recognized for her research and practice of ancient technologies. She will demonstrate the making of yucca cordage and how it was used to create other useful items such as sandals and textiles. While she demonstrates, Ms. Weahkee will discuss her work, share her knowledge, and answer questions.

Senator Henry Teller’s Whistlestop Tour

Saturday, September 17, 10:30 a.m., 1:00 p.m., & 2:15 p.m.

Presented by the Animas Museum at the Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad Museum
Location: Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad Museum
Contact: Animas Museum, info@animasmuseum.org, 970.259.2402

Join the Animas Museum and Durango and Silverton Railroad as they recreate a campaign stop by Senator Henry Teller supporting William Jennings Bryan for President in 1896. Hear his fiery oratory as he attacks the wealthy and powerful men who control the country and defends the common working people of Colorado, who are suffering during the Panic of 1893 and the Silver Crash! John Steinle, historian and author will portray Senator Teller.

A Brief History of Ragtime and Jazz

Sunday, September 18, 3:00 – 5:00 p.m.

Presented by Pine River Arts at the Walchak Residence
Contact: Shelley Walchak, swalchak@gmail.com, 303.941.4012,

Adam Swanson is one of the world’s foremost pianists and historians of vintage American popular music, including ragtime, early jazz, the Great American Songbook, and more. Adam has been a featured performer and lecturer at ragtime and jazz festivals across the United States and abroad, and he is the only four-time winner of the World Championship Old-Time Piano Playing Contest. He made his New York debut at Carnegie Hall at the age of nineteen, where he performed with Michael Feinstein. For this event Adam will briefly discuss the history of ragtime leading up to jazz while playing accompanying music on the piano. Tickets at www.pineriverarts.org.

Marie Curie Chautauqua Portrayal by Susan Marie Frontczak

Thursday, September 22,  7:00 – 8:30 p.m.  

Presented by Fort Lewis College Lifelong Learning , Colorado Humanities, and Southwest Colorado Humanities Roundtable
Location: 130 Noble Hall, Fort Lewis College
Contact: Gary Rottman, gsorcer@hotmail.com
PROOF OF VACCINATION REQUIRED

Marie Curie – scientist, mother, and teacher – changed our world through her discovery of radium and radioactivity. From the political oppression of her childhood, to scientific emergence and fame, this is a life that speaks to the tenacity of the human spirit and the enduring allure of scientific discovery. Time travel back to 1915 to hear the story of this introverted, focused scientist who discovered a new element whose compounds really do glow in the dark. Few understand the obstacles she faced just to get into the laboratory or the path that led to two Nobel Prizes. Program includes an in-character presentation, a Q&A with  “Marie Curie” and a Q&A with the presenter.

Senator Henry Teller’s Whistlestop Tour

Saturday, September 17, 10:30 a.m., 1:00 p.m., & 2:30 p.m.

Presented by the Animas Museum at the Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad Museum
Location: Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad Museum
Contact: Animas Museum, info@animasmuseum.org, 970.259.2402

Join the Animas Museum and Durango and Silverton Railroad as they recreate a campaign stop by Senator Henry Teller supporting William Jennings Bryan for President in 1896. Hear his fiery oratory as he attacks the wealthy and powerful men who control the country and defends the common working people of Colorado, who are suffering during the Panic of 1893 and the Silver Crash! John Steinle, historian and author will portray Senator Teller.

A Brief History of Ragtime and Jazz

Sunday, September 18, 3:00 – 5:00 p.m.

Presented by Pine River Arts at the Walchak Residence
Contact: Shelley Walchak, swalchak@gmail.com, 303.941.4012,

Adam Swanson is one of the world’s foremost pianists and historians of vintage American popular music, including ragtime, early jazz, the Great American Songbook, and more. Adam has been a featured performer and lecturer at ragtime and jazz festivals across the United States and abroad, and he is the only four-time winner of the World Championship Old-Time Piano Playing Contest. He made his New York debut at Carnegie Hall at the age of nineteen, where he performed with Michael Feinstein. For this event Adam will briefly discuss the history of ragtime leading up to jazz while playing accompanying music on the piano. Tickets at www.pineriverarts.org.

Marie Curie Chautauqua Portrayal by Susan Marie Frontczak

Thursday, September 22,  7:00 – 8:30 p.m.  

Presented by Fort Lewis College Lifelong Learning , Colorado Humanities, and Southwest Colorado Humanities Roundtable
Location: 130 Noble Hall, Fort Lewis College
Contact: Gary Rottman, gsorcer@hotmail.com
PROOF OF VACCINATION REQUIRED

Marie Curie – scientist, mother, and teacher – changed our world through her discovery of radium and radioactivity. From the political oppression of her childhood, to scientific emergence and fame, this is a life that speaks to the tenacity of the human spirit and the enduring allure of scientific discovery. Time travel back to 1915 to hear the story of this introverted, focused scientist who discovered a new element whose compounds really do glow in the dark. Few understand the obstacles she faced just to get into the laboratory or the path that led to two Nobel Prizes. Program includes an in-character presentation, a Q&A with  “Marie Curie” and a Q&A with the presenter.

Erma Bombeck Chautauqua Portrayal by Susan Marie Frontczak

Friday, September 23,  7:00 – 8:30 p.m.

Presented by Colorado Humanities and the Southwest Colorado Humanities Roundtable
Location: 130 Noble Hall Fort Lewis College
Contact: Shelley Walchak, swalchak@gmail.com, 303.941.4012,
PROOF OF VACCINATION REQUIRED

Erma Bombeck captured with paring-knife-sharp humor the daily life of a new American phenomenon: the suburban housewife. Having figured out from her own personal experience that if you can laugh at it you can live with it, she chronicled the housewife’s daily struggles in her column “At Wit’s End” three days a week. She eventually appeared in 900 newspapers across the country and in books such as I Lost Everything in the Post-Natal Depression and The Grass is Always Greener Over the Septic Tank. Bombeck brought to American awareness the life of women whose lives otherwise felt invisible and taken for granted. This program consists of a monologue in-character, followed first by a Q&A with “Erma Bombeck” and then by a Q&A with the scholar/presenter.

Historic Use of Horses, Mules, and Burros in the San Juan National Forest

Wednesday, September 28, 6:00 – 7:30 p.m.

Presented by Pine River Library and the San Juan National Forest
Location: Pine River Library
Contact: Darcy Poletti, 970.884.2222 ext. 522, darcy@prlibrary.org

Horses, mules, and burros have assisted with daily tasks since their introduction to the area in the mid 1600’s.  American Indians, hard rock miners, early settlers, and the San Juan National Forest have all benefited from these animals both in their willingness to assist with a variety of tasks and as a companion while traveling through the San Juan Mountains. Liz Francisco, San Juan National Forest, Columbine Ranger District Archaeologist, will lead the presentation, which will also include a show and tell of historic pack saddles, panniers, and fire fighting equipment on a pack string in the library parking lot.

Contact Darcy Poletti, 970.884.2222 ext. 522, darcy@prlibrary.org

Bonanza! Music of the American West

Thursday, September 29, 7:00 – 8:30 p.m.

Presented by Fort Lewis College Lifelong Learning
Location: 130 Noble Hall, Fort Lewis College
Contact: Gary Rottman, gsorcer@hotmail.com
Explore the sights and sounds of the colorful and exciting American West as portrayed in movies, TV, and social media with Linda Mack Berven, artistic director and conductor of the Durango Choral Society. Sing along with your favorite and memorable themes as she illustrates the historical, cultural, and social impact of music on our understanding and appreciation of the West.

Erma Bombeck Chautauqua Portrayal by Susan Marie Frontczak

Friday, September 23,  7:00 – 8:30 p.m.

Presented by Colorado Humanities and the Southwest Colorado Humanities Roundtable
Location: 130 Noble Hall, Fort Lewis College
Contact: Shelley Walchak, swalchak@gmail.com, 303.941.4012,
PROOF OF VACCINATION REQUIRED

Erma Bombeck captured with paring-knife-sharp humor the daily life of a new American phenomenon: the suburban housewife. Having figured out from her own personal experience that if you can laugh at it you can live with it, she chronicled the housewife’s daily struggles in her column “At Wit’s End” three days a week. She eventually appeared in 900 newspapers across the country and in books such as I Lost Everything in the Post-Natal Depression and The Grass is Always Greener Over the Septic Tank. Bombeck brought to American awareness the life of women whose lives otherwise felt invisible and taken for granted. This program consists of a monologue in-character, followed first by a Q&A with “Erma Bombeck” and then by a Q&A with the scholar/presenter.

Historic Use of Horses, Mules, and Burros in the San Juan National Forest

Wednesday, September 28, 6:00 – 7:30 p.m.

Presented by Pine River Library and the San Juan National Forest
Location: Pine River Library
Contact: Darcy Poletti, 970.884.2222 ext. 522, darcy@prlibrary.org

Horses, mules, and burros have assisted with daily tasks since their introduction to the area in the mid 1600’s.  American Indians, hard rock miners, early settlers, and the San Juan National Forest have all benefited from these animals both in their willingness to assist with a variety of tasks and as a companion while traveling through the San Juan Mountains. Liz Francisco, San Juan National Forest, Columbine Ranger District Archaeologist, will lead the presentation, which will also include a show and tell of historic pack saddles, panniers, and fire fighting equipment on a pack string in the library parking lot.

Contact Darcy Poletti, 970.884.2222 ext. 522, darcy@prlibrary.org

Bonanza! Music of the American West

Thursday, September 29, 7:00 – 8:30 p.m.

Presented by Fort Lewis College Lifelong Learning
Location: 130 Noble Hall, Fort Lewis College
Contact: Gary Rottman, gsorcer@hotmail.com
Explore the sights and sounds of the colorful and exciting American West as portrayed in movies, TV, and social media with Linda Mack Berven, artistic director and conductor of the Durango Choral Society. Sing along with your favorite and memorable themes as she illustrates the historical, cultural, and social impact of music on our understanding and appreciation of the West.